Performance Artist To Have Sex With A Different Man Every Day For A Year

Performance Artist To Have Sex With A Different Man Every Day For A YearThe Huffington Post | By Priscilla Frank

Mischa Badasyan is a 26-year-old gay man who sometimes feels lonely and unfulfilled from the sexual interactions initiated by hookup apps like Grindr and sites like GayRomeo.

Badasyan is also a Russian-born, Berlin-based performance artist who, beginning in September, will have sex with a different man every day for an entire year. The controversial piece, titled "Save the Date," will explore the feeling of emptiness so pervasive in today's hookup culture, especially for gay men.

Source: Performance Artist To Have Sex With A Different Man Every Day For A Year

He goes on to say...

"Generally, I’m not going to tell my dates about this project," the artist told Vocativ. "What if I tell you I just had sex with you for an art project? People won’t like that. It’s horrible, actually."



So, is it art or is it cruising...? I'm really not sure what to think of it. Do I need to think anything?
Comments

Bonnets Rouges

This will form part of an ongoing series of research clips on Brittany…

Bonnets Rouges

The bonnets rouges (red caps) movement began in October, 2013 in Brittany. It was a protest movement, largely targeting a new tax on truck-transport (billed as an “ecotaxe” by the government). By means of large demonstrations and direct action, which included the destruction of many highway tax portals, the movement successfully forced the French government to rescind the tax.an anti-tax sign affixed to an “ecotaxe” portal a few days before it was destroyed.

The new tax was seen as harmful to Breton agriculture, which was already having a difficult time competing with its counterparts in Europe.The wearing of red caps was intended as a reference to the seventeenth century revolt of the papier timbré which was particularly active in Brittany, though the Phrygian cap as a protest symbol goes back much further.

Activity

Hundreds of red-cap-wearing demonstrators protested against the highway tax portal at Pont-de-Buis on 28 October 2013, and during the course of the protest a demonstrator had his hand blown off when he picked up a grenade thrown by law enforcement. Soon after, the French government announced that it would be temporarily suspending the new tax until 2015 at the earliest. This did not satisfy the demonstrators, who went on to destroy more than two dozen tax portals, and many smaller radar-camera-like outposts, by the first week of November. These would typically be destroyed by fire, often by filling tires, stacked at their bases, with flammable material and lighting them. Sometimes, less-destructive means were used, such as wrapping the radar cameras in plastic and topping them with bonnets rouges of their own.

By late November, 46 tax radars and portals had been destroyed, and other anti-tax groups were beginning to try direct action, including farmers and equestrians who snarled traffic in Paris with their tractors and horses. At the end of November, the movement massed in Carhaix and simultaneously used shipping trucks to blockade highways throughout France. At one point the demonstrators held an auction at which they sold off bits and pieces of previously-destroyed road tax portals as souvenirs. In an amusing moment, a hundred employees of Ecomouv, the quasi-private company responsible for collecting the new tax, held a holiday party in Metz. Posing for a group photo in front of the company offices in their Santa Claus hats, they were mistaken for a demonstration of the bonnets rouges by local police, who quickly intervened.

By January, the number of highway tax and radar-ticket machines destroyed had topped 200. This had the desired effect. In 2013, for the first time since ticket-giving radar cameras had been installed in France, the number of tickets issued by the machines declined. The government made its first big counterattacks in the Spring. Eleven suspected bonnets rouges were arrested and charged with conspiracy in April. The following month, the government convicted Samantha Prime of participating in the destruction of a radar outpost. Destruction of highway tax portals, however, continued. The eleven conspirators were convicted and sentenced to between four and 18 months imprisonment, along with a total of about €10,000 in fines. The same day the sentences were declared, farmers in Brittany invaded the city of Morlaix, dumped their produce in big piles in the streets, set fire to the tax office, and blockaded the area to keep fire trucks from responding. In September and October, three other French tax offices were put to the torch, and French tax officials complained of feeling threatened.

The French government finally decided, in late October, to abandon the hated tax entirely. The cost to the government was enormous. In addition to the loss of anticipated revenue from the tax (€390 million per year) and the property damage and other costs associated with the demonstrations, the government was required to pay compensation to Ecomouv, the quasi-private company that had contracted to administer the tax, and others — nearly one billion euros in all.

Source: Bonnets Rouges – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Comments

Group Critique Presentation

The images from my group crit presentation are as follows:

An Uhelgoad Poste
An Uhelgoad


Saint-Herbot2
Saint-Herbot

Kroas ar Hars
Kroas ar Hars

untitled (60 of 77)-Edit
Ode Tredudon

untitled (1 of 5)
Kenec'h David

karhaez3
Karaez-Plougêr

Skrigneg
Skrigneg

untitled (87 of 183)-Edit
Penn-ar-Bed


The questions are:

  • Does it become confusing to have multiple themes weaving through the series?
  • Does the total lack of people detract?
Comments

The thrill of it all - Harry Callahan

Screen Shot 2015-11-29 at 08.58.43
http://secretcinema1.tumblr.com

Ireland, 1979, Harry Callahan

Source: The Thrill Of It All



I saw these via Tumblr, they said something about the emptiness I sense in Brittany...
Comments

Digital images can't be trusted, says war photographer Don McCullin | Art and design | The Guardian

One of Britain’s most celebrated and respected photographers has lamented the digital domination of his field, calling it “a totally lying experience” that cannot be trusted.Don McCullin, one of the world’s finest photographers of war and disaster, said the digital revolution meant viewers could no longer trust the truthfulness of images they see.



Source: Digital images can't be trusted, says war photographer Don McCullin | Art and design | The Guardian



Ok, so before I go anywhere with this, I absolutely think McCullin is a legend. The things he has seen and reported would reduce me to absolute nothing, a wreck of a man, and perhaps it does to him too, sometimes. But to imply that digital can't be trusted infers that film is truth. It isn't, just a version of it. And just because it's film, doesn't mean to say it's impervious to being played with. McCullin has done it himself, although he (and others) will no doubt argue that he's played within the rules. Maybe he has, but that isn't to say that he hasn't played.

Some years ago, I went to McCullin's retrospective at the IWM in Manchester, there a photograph of his "Shell Shocked US Marine, Hue, Vietnam, February 1968" sat beside a smaller version that contained the printing notes (see here). McCullin hasn't moved pixels, but he's changed the way the image comes across. He's made it more dramatic. More striking. More newsworthy. I want to stress that this is indeed within the bounds of what I deem to be acceptable. It's what I do in PS too. A bit of dodging, a bit of burning and tweaking the contrast.

Is dodging and burning for dramatic effect any different to making things look "attractive"? I don't think so.

I agree that there is an ease to these things with PS, and yes, people will move some pixels around, remove blemishes and make people look thinner. They'll even add people or remove them. This used to happen in the "olden" days too though. I remember OJ Simpson was made to look darker on the cover of Time when he was on trial, and the Russians were well known for it in the 1930s and 40s (this was discussed on the TV series Genius of Photography with Rodchenko's White Sea Canal, 1933). And what about Rejoinder? Yeah, it goes on. And it went on beforehand too.

I've not even started on framing and composition and (yet again) Errol Morris' elephant.



Photography can't be "trusted", period.
Comments

Richard Prince - Biography, Exhibitions, and Art on ARTUNER

Prince proposes that “Rephotography is a technique for stealing (pirating) already existing images, simulating rather than copying them, ‘managing’ rather than quoting them. A re-photo is essentially an appropriation of what’s already real about an existing image and an attempt to add or additionalise this reality onto something more real”.



Source: Richard Prince - Biography, Exhibitions, and Art on ARTUNER
Comments

Karaez-Plougêr

karhaez7
Comments

John Darwell - Chernobyl

Darwell
johndarwell.com

Images produced within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, a 30 kilometer radius no-entry area that was evacuated after the nuclear meltdown at the Chernobyl Power Plant in 1986. The area contained one major city, Pripyat, over seventy villages and scores of farms. The people living in these locations were given twenty four hours to gather their possessions and were then moved to locations around the Ukraine, in most cases never to return.



Source: John Darwell – Category Default



It has been a while since I looked at this body of work, and I didn’t remember all of it. I only really remembered the sense of melancholy, of quiet and desertion. I was a little worried my approach to Le Loup… might end up like this (after the apocalypse…), but on re-looking at it, there will be quite some difference.
Comments

Trabrivan

Trebrivan4
Comments

Karaez-Plougêr

karhaez6
Comments

Plouie

Plouie6
Comments

An Uhelgoad

An Uhelgoad4
Comments

Saint-Herbot

Saint-Herbot2
Comments

Making Day - After Stephen Shore II

The latest making day was an opportunity to progress with an alternative interpretation of my After Stephen Shore project. Rather than continuing with the more direct approach, I decided to explore the direction of the "void" version I'd discussed towards the end of September, which was partially triggered by Leppard's quote cited in Liz Wells' Land Matters:

Photographs are about memory - or perhaps about the absence of memory, providing pictures to fill voids, illustrating and sometimes falsifying our collective memory.

Shore's photographs feel familiar to me. Actually, no that's not it. Shore hits a space with his photographs that is there in me because I've been indoctrinated with American culture, growing up with US TV programs and the like. His photographs (from Uncommon Places) are from the 70s, just like Starchy & Hutch, Kojak and The Streets of San Francisco and the like. They sit there, filling that void brought on by a vague knowing without first hand experience.

There are also a few other things I've decided to work with too. A few years ago I read a piece by Errol Morris about Fenton's Crimean photographs, in it he spoke about the elephant outside the frame. The fact of the matter is that 99% of the time, we don't know what was excluded from a photograph. We don't know if there was an elephant cropped from the image. So why did Shore choose the framing he did? What makes number 611 Wolf Street more interesting to him than, 615 or 625? Or the opposite side of the street? Using Google Street View to expand his framing allows you to see some of this. GSV is completely objective, photographing everything every 8m or whatever the interval is. Yes, there is some censorship of faces and words performed by software, but the 8-eyed beast sees pretty much everything.

This also leads to something else I find interesting; the changes brought on by the passage of time. In the few examples I worked with during the making day, the changes are fairly superficial. The 70s vibe from the fashions, the colours, the cars and even the shop signage has passed, but the architecture is by and large the same. Not so with other locations I found when doing my more literal project a few months ago. But yes, things do change and I find that fascinating; the comparisons, the thrill of spotting a similarity, recognising things even if just in the background. It's one of the major things I've enjoyed about working first with Ruscha's images, then Shore's.

And yes, it's also all about the journey...

With this approach, I do have concerns. Without access to the Shore original when viewing my photographs, I fear the context will be lost. Yes, they will still be curious. Why have I done what I have done? What can't we see? In not seeing what one artist has made important, is my work left unimportant? Uninteresting? Is it something of a clique work - you will only "get" it if you are familiar with the original? If it were ever to be shown, how would you do this without Shore's work sitting alongside (and yes, I'd be happy to share an exhibition...)

Many questions to think about and address (maybe), but in the meantime here are the photographs:

CHurch and Second Easton
Church Street and Second Street, Easton, Pennsylvania, Aug 2013
(after Church Street and Second Street, Easton, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1974)


Deaderick Street
Deaderick Street, Nashville, Tennessee, Jul 2015
(after Deaderick Street, Nashville, Tennessee, May 2, 1974)


Richland Mall GSV
Richland Mall, US 30, Mansfield, Ohio, Jun 2011
(after Richland Mall, US 30, Mansfield, Ohio, July 5, 1973)


W15 Vine GSV
West Fifteenth Street and Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, Aug 2015
(after West Fifteenth Street and Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, May 15, 1974)


Wilde and Colonialization
Wilde Street and Colonization Avenue, Dryden, Ontario, Jun 2012
(after Wilde Street and Colonization Avenue, Dryden, Ontario, August 15, 1974)


Wolf STreet GSV
Wolf Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jun 2014
(after Wolf Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 28, 1975)


21st and Spruce GSV
Twenty-First Street and Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jun 2014
(after Twenty-First Street and Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1974)


20th and Spruce GSV
Twentieth Street and Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 2014
(after Twentieth Street and Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1974)


Second Street, Ashland GSV
Second Street, Ashland, Wisconsin, Oct 2008
(after Second Street, Ashland, Wisconsin, July 9, 1973)


We can see if this goes anywhere...

Comments

Plouie

Plouie8
Comments

Censorship

Is it more important to be utterly non-offensive, or to be able to say what you think without fear of having your voice removed? (I’m not meaning in order to incite violence or hate here)

If art of any kind must be made in a safe and sterile void, does it have any meaning other than being (at best) pretty vacuous?

Things have been happening in the background that make me wonder.
Comments

Karaez-Plougêr

karhaez3
Comments

Brenniliz

Brenniliz1
Comments

Steffi Klenz

Steffi
www.steffiklenz.co.uk

Steffi Klenz is another of the photographers mentioned during the tutorial with Joanna Lowry.
Comments

Peter Fraser

Fraser

Peter Fraser was recommended during the tutorial with Joanna Lowry.
Comments

Saint-Herbot

S Herbod

I'm not 100% sure about the Breton name here - the hamlet is named after the chapel that's there. In Breton, that's the Chapel Sant-Herbod, rather than Chapelle Saint-Herbot in the French. However, I've only seen the French spelling for the hamlet - Saint-Herbot. All the road signs are in French (unless referring to the chapel), and I've not found anything online yet to say otherwise.
Comments

Karaez-Plougêr

Karaez1
Comments

Tutorial with Joanna Lowry

Today’s one-to-one hour long lecture was with Joanna Lowry, leader of the Photography MA at the University of Brighton.

Discussions were centred around the Brittany project Le Loup… When asked to describe what was drawing me to document the area, I found it difficult. Much of what I recounted was personal, my reaction to being there, rather than anything specifically interesting about the area itself, which prompted the recommendation that I should think about “the place” rather than about “myself in the place”. This should help make it more accessible to others, less personal.

Isolation, charm, otherness, toughness/resilience, a step away from modernity, nostalgia were all things I came up with. There is a resistance to the stereotypical French “chic”, it’s less ostentatious (unless we’re comparing tractors).

Whilst it’s perfectly possible to photograph a bus stop (as with the photograph Kroas ar Hars), what does it mean? In order for the series to gain further meaning, I need to deepen my “understanding” of the area (rather than simply “knowledge”) – history, stories, myths, political attitudes, etc. Such things might help the various threads intertwine, to trigger something with the viewer. Help it mean something, even if I don’t know yet what that “something” is.

Kroas ar Hars
Kroas ar Hars

There was talk of contemporary photographic practice. I spoke of specifically not wanting to produce work like David Chancellor’s Huntress with Buck – I’d rather not take photographs at all (as good as it may be, it’s simply not what I want to do). Alec Soth was mentioned, also something I do not wish to pursue, although closer than Chancellor. I spoke about the lack of people (and the reason), and a fear that it might end up looking like after the zombie apocalypse. I thought about John Darwell’s Chernobyl photographs – I need to look at these again.
Work by Sarah Pickering was mentioned in relation to An Uhelgoad, although I think this may have meant to have been Steffi Klenz’s Nonsuch in Poundbury. As was Peter Fraser’s Welsh Valley work and William Christenberry’s American houses (later posts will undoubtedly look at these).

An Uhelgoad Poste
An Uhelgoad

Talking around the various words, “empty” “resistance” and “history” kept on coming to the fore, which then tied in with a possible thread of depopulation – approx. 30% of houses in a local village are owned as second houses (much as is mine), a place to go for holiday. There are photographs of graffitied signs: “Free Bzh” is clearly aimed at the English, but there are also attempts to reclaim Nantes from Loire Atlantique. It’s something to explore further. There are already several layers of politics (with a small “p”) that I’m aware of and undoubtedly subconsciously influencing my work.

The aesthetic was described as “melancholia”, which fits my personality and completely apt for me. This aesthetic might become more “interesting” because of the politics. There are transitory signs of disquiet. History might be seen as emptying out of a place, with something “other” taking that place.

Size was discussed; I personally don’t believe that, as of right now, there is any need for these images to be particularly large (many, not all, are photographed with a medium format digital camera, so could perhaps support larger prints). A book might be the primary goal, with a curated narrative and careful layout choices, but the gallery should also be considered.

This was an incredibly useful talk, helping to bring vague thoughts into the real world by having to voice them to someone else, and then to have that person, a photographic theorist, bounce other thoughts, threads and hooks around is great. I feel like I’ve taken much from it, lots hope it sinks in and I action the discussion too.

Comments

Skrigneg

Skrigneg
Comments

An Uhelgoad

An Uhelgoad2
Comments

An Uhelgoad

An Uhelgoad Poste
Comments

Kroas ar Hars

Kroas ar Hars
Comments

di'splei

Last Monday was supposed to be a “Show ’n’ Tell” evening, with each of us having a topic to research and informally present our findings. Out of Audience, Engagement, Site and Display, I opted for the latter and focussed my attention on something that divides my opinion - size. Unfortunately I was having connection trouble in France, but I sort of expected this so I provided the slides with some speakers notes so that they could be read and (hopefully) understood.

Anyway, sometimes I like big prints, they’re impressive and you can almost step into them, other times I like the intimacy of holding a small print in my hand and peering into it. One thing that is fairly obvious, regardless of what I think or like, is that over the years prints have been getting bigger! Now, there have long been billboards with photographic images on them, that’s not what I’m referring to. What I mean is proper “photograph quality” prints. To me, it seems that some photographers are making larger prints just so they will be more commodified, I don’t always like the end result when this is the case (as with some work of Normandy bunkers I saw in the Tate Modern last year - at the Conflict, Time, Photography exhibition). Others create images that demand being larger. Struth is one that we expect to be larger, although to be honest, I’m of the opinion they’re too large - certainly when I saw his work in the Whitechapel Gallery in London a few years ago, they were soft when you really looked at them. In a book (several factors of scale smaller, of course), they are razor sharp!

Anyway, enough of this at the moment, here’s my presentation (click image to download as pptx file):
Display
Comments